• About this album
  • We spent 3 nights here in Phnom Penh at a hotel that wasn't too bad, but certainly wasn't quite what we had gotten used to on our travels.

    But what was important was visiting the somewhat sombre locations used by the Khmer Rouge to carry out their mass genocide - The Killing Fields and Tuol Sleng Museum.

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    After crossing the Vietnam/Cambodia border, we were dropped at a nearby eatery for lunch. There was still another 4 hr ride to Phnom Penh
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    The very al fresco style gents ... just beyond the kitchen area
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    Whilst waiting for the ferry crossing over the Mekong river, street vendors with their produce milled around in the hope of making a sale
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    Think these are beetles and perhaps pigeon
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    Chooks being transported across the river en masse
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    The pigs had a little bit more space than the chickens
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    The river is used for bathing - both human and horse
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    Prime riverside real-estate
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    Series of typical Cambodian homes along the main road to Phnom Penh and after crossing the Mekong River
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    Most mini-buses were always filled to capacity and usually had folk sitting on the top
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    No such thing as wasted space here
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    This was an eye opener - the makeshift outdoor kitchen of a restaurant beside the hotel we were in
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    The 'kitchen' in full swing. Think this was for a wedding dinner
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    Memorial stupa to the many victims of the Killing Fields at Choeung Ek south of Phnom Penh
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    Victims of the Khmer Rouge
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    A sad reminder of what humans are capable of
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    Over 5,000 skulls fill the shelves in the memorial stupa
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    The clothes of the many victims
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    An owl (spotted at Choeung Ek) giving me the 'stare'
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    Mass graves of the many victims. Unearthed in 1980
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    Remains of clothes in the ground
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    Bits and pieces still being found till today
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    Bone and clothing fragments still visible
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    Some victims of the killing fields, including an Australian journalist
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    Part of a large 'water' garden of vegetables
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    Cambodian village life
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    Log transport company
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    At the Toul Sleng museum (or S21 as named by the Khmer Rouge). These are the graves of the last victims of the Khmer Rouge found the day the Vietnamese freed the city
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    Photo of one of the last victims on the torture bed
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    One of the several torture rooms
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    Photos of victims. The Khmer Rouge kept records of the millions they killed
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    The whole museum had rows of boards displaying photos of the many victims
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    Children were not spared
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    Schakles
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    Some of the very tiny cells that held the many prisoners
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    Some of the implements of torture - the 'box' to the right is a water boarding chamber (for simulated drowning). Note: Such implements of torture are still in use today by the Americans ... guess its harder for some to learn than others
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    The hall now dedicated to the stories of both victims and perpertrators
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    Building within the compound of the Royal Residence
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    Edge of the Royal Residence
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    Part of the residence
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    Example of french architecture in Phnom Penh
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    Fishing on the Ton Le Sap River on which Phonm Penh sits
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    Pavilion near the river
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    Not sure what temple / building this is
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    The National Museum
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    The only photo we got in the museum before being banned from taking more :-)
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    'Architraves' on the National Museum building
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    Elephant carving
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    Sculpture within the grounds of the museum
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    A pavilion in the Wat Phnom compound. Wat Phnom was formerly known as "Wat Phnom Duan Penh", from which Phnom Penh gets its name
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    Typical of Cambodia. We'd come up with a little ditty about 'Everything is $1 in Cambodia"
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    Outside the Wat Phnom temple
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    Inside the temple
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    Spice finches are released as a Buddhist custom and is considered an act of compassion that will be rewarded with good karma. But before that happens, these birds have to sit in this tiny cage.
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    Our tuk-tuk driver and a shop keeper that was very helpful in providing lots of information on Cambodia
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    Chickens on a bike
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    This is one way you can get fuel for your motorbike
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    Chicken Amok (yum) and pork stir fry cambodian style
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    At another restaurant alongside the river
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    The meal we had there
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    Along some dusty road - quite typical of many areas in Cambodia
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    Prime riverside real-estate on river choked with weed
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    A pagoda being guarded by a horseman
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    Monument to symbolise the end of war
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    Poverty in Cambodia
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    Street scene. Not too far from the hotel we stayed at. Dusty roads were typical of Cambodia
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    Monkeys often seen using power lines to visit homes presumably to steal food
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    Desolate poverty